Psychosocial challenges and coping strategies of caregivers with family members under palliative care in Mufakose, Zimbabwe

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Tsitsi Mguwata

Abstract

This study sought to unearth the challenges and coping strategies of caregivers with family members under palliative care. As a high-density suburb, Mufakose is a dwelling place for the most economically marginalised members of the Zimbabwe urban dwellers. Having a family member under palliative care while being from a low social class has its ramifications and this was what the researcher sought to find out by carrying a qualitative research on six care givers (n = 6) sampled by purposive sampling. In-depth interviews guided by a self-constructed interview guide were used to collect data and thematic analysis was used for analysis. The interviews were carried out in Shona, the local language for the participants, and responses were later translated to English. The study indicated that the caregivers encountered a myriad of challenges ranging from social, economic and health problems. Disturbed sleeping patterns, weight loss, stress, inhibited social mobility, strained family relationships, limited health information about the illness, role conflict and increased financial constraints were the major cited challenges. The research established that caregivers are proactive and numerous coping strategies are used in dealing with the challenges. The coping strategies being used can be classified into appraisal-focused, problem-focused and emotion-focused. Although some coping strategies are maladaptive, most of them are quite adaptive, and with effective interventions the fortunes and lifestyle of caregivers can be overturned.


 


Keywords: Palliative care, family caregiver, coping strategy, challenges, home-based care.

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How to Cite
Mguwata, T. (2020). Psychosocial challenges and coping strategies of caregivers with family members under palliative care in Mufakose, Zimbabwe. Global Journal of Psychology Research: New Trends and Issues, 10(2), 210–220. https://doi.org/10.18844/gjpr.v10i2.4797
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